Restoring the Museum of Flight’s 747 — City of Everett

Forty-five years ago, she made history, ushering in the era of the jumbo jet and changing the face of commercial flight. A giant of the skies, it made our world smaller and mesmerized the people of the Pacific Northwest, us included.

When the 747 dubbed The City of Everett (RA001) took her inaugural flight on February 9, 1969, it was an enormous day for both of us. And just as we are tremendously proud to be a part of the Boeing 747’s legacy—as chief engineer and co-pilot on the first flight—we’re equally proud to be a part of her renewal at The Museum of Flight.

Since accessioning the first 747, the Museum and its dedicated team have been faithfully caring for the aircraft, but Seattle’s damp climate takes a toll, and The City of Everett is showing signs of wear. That’s why, this summer, the Museum will embark on an ambitious project—a complete external restoration to return her to first flight conditions.


(via Restoring the Museum of Flight’s 747 — City of Everett | The Museum of Flight)

The Future of Air Travel - GE

GE works on things that matter. The best people and the best technologies taking on the toughest challenges. Finding solutions in energy, health and home, transportation and finance. Building, powering, moving and curing the world. Not just imagining. Doing. GE works

Search for Malaysian jet resumes off Australia after weather improves

About 20 to 30 protesters threw water bottles at the Malaysian embassy and tried to storm the building, demanding to meet the ambassador, witnesses said. Earlier, the relatives, many with tear-stained faces, had linked arms and chanted “Malaysian government has cheated us” and “Malaysia, return our relatives” as they marched peacefully and held banners.

The relatives’ grief and anger was unleashed on Monday night after Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak announced that Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, which vanished more than two weeks ago while flying to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur, had crashed in the southern Indian Ocean.

Citing satellite-data analysis by British company Inmarsat, he said there was now no doubt that the Boeing jet came down in the ocean in one of the most remote places on Earth - an implicit admission that all 239 people on board had died.